Spice Shelf: Black Peppercorns

  • Pin It
  • print
  • email to a friend

Spice Shelf: Black Peppercorns

By The Paula Deen Test Kitchen

Peppercorns are the dried berries of a smooth, woody vine called—you guessed it—a pepper plant. Depending on when the berries are picked, the pepper is white (very ripe), black (half ripe), or green (un-ripe). (Pink peppercorns actually come from a completely different plant.) Black pepper is the most pungent, flavorful, and widely used of all types of pepper, and for good reason! It’s as versatile as it is delicious.

Storage
Peppercorns should be stored in an air tight, glass container in a cool, dark place away from direct sunlight. Whole black peppercorns stay fresh for over a year.

Selection
There are three main advantages to buying whole peppercorn and grinding it yourself.
1) It’s more flavorful! Keeping your peppercorn whole locks in the flavor for longer
2) You know what you’re getting! Many brands of ground pepper are often mixed with other spices.
3) You control the grind! You pick how fine or course to grind your pepper depending on intended use.

Whole peppercorn should be heavy, compact, round and free of blemishes. It’s also important to remember that the typical cook is peppering almost everything; this everyday spice is not the place to penny pinch. Typically good quality pepper is not much more expensive than lesser quality pepper.

History
Pepper has played an important role in history. Pepper catalyzed spice trade, which lead to the exploration of new worlds, and helped develop major merchant cities in Europe and the Middle East. It has been used as a currency (to pay taxes and ransoms), a sacred offering (to honor gods), and a seasoning. From a culinary perspective, pepper was used not only to spice up bland foods, but also to mask not-so-fresh food flavor, which was especially important before preservation was prevalent.

Tips and Tricks
- If cooked for too long, pepper can start to loose its flavor and aroma. For an extra peppery flavor, add pepper near the end of cooking.
- Black pepper improves digestion and reduces gas because it has antibacterial effects. So if you’re eating chili… pepper up!
- The outer layer of the peppercorn stimulates the breakdown of fat cells.

“Pepper”-ation
Pepper starts losing its pungency and flavor the instant it’s ground. If you have a pepper mill (and need a relatively small amount) grind as needed. You can also grind pepper in small batches (and keep it in an air tight jar). If you’d rather pre-grind pepper in small batches, test for freshness before using. Rub a small amount of the ground pepper in the palm of your hand, then smell and taste it. If the aroma is weak, or the taste is bland, throw it out! (Caution: sneezing may occur.)

Recipes
Vanilla and Peppercorn Crusted Rack of Lamb with Vanilla Bean Butter Sauce
Hot Spiced Apple-Pear Cider
Pickled Vegetables
The Lola Burger
Pickled Shrimp Michael’s Recipe
Paula’s Savannah-Style Blue Crabs
Mustard Peppercorn Crusted Ribeye

Read More From On the Shelf.

You May Also Like These Articles:

You May Also Like These Recipes:

  • Veal Loin Stuffed with Roasted Bell Peppers, Goat Cheese, and Basil Veal Loin Stuffed with Roasted Bell Peppers, Goat Cheese, and Basil
    View Now
  • Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with Cilantro Lime Mayonnaise Blackened Tilapia Sandwich with Cilantro Lime Mayonnaise
    54321
    View Now
  • Ghostly Grilled Cheese Ghostly Grilled Cheese
    54321
    View Now
  • Roasted Potato Salad with Blue Cheese Dressing Roasted Potato Salad with Blue Cheese Dressing
    54321
    View Now

Leave a Comment

Reader Comments:

54321

You are the best Mrs. Deen. I like your recipes and cook for my family. Best regards from Panama.

By irma villamil on May 16, 2013

My Recipe Box |

Paula's Upcoming Schedule

Recent Shows & Recipes